Where F. Scott Fitzgerald Found His Muse

Where F. Scott Fitzgerald Found His Muse

From The Washington Post: In the summer of 1919, a brokenhearted 22-year-old Army lieutenant climbed to the third floor of his parents’ rowhouse in St. Paul, Minn., and began to write a novel. He pinned the outline of his manuscript to the curtains of the bedroom...
The Enigmatic Brontë Sisters

The Enigmatic Brontë Sisters

From The Daily Beast: The enduring fiction by the three Brontë sisters tells us that authors do not have to lead exciting lives to be great. As the Brontës prove, it’s the inner life that counts. Every so often, a new discovery comes along that reignites the question:...
Orwell’s 1984 Relevant More Than Ever

Orwell’s 1984 Relevant More Than Ever

From the DailyMail.com: Nineteen Eighty-Four was published in London on Wednesday, June 8, 1949, and in New York five days later. The world was eager for it. Within 12 months, it had sold around 50,000 hardbacks in the UK; in the U.S. sales were more than one-third of...
The Lymond Chronicles Forever

The Lymond Chronicles Forever

If you decide to tackle the The Lymond Chronicles and Dorothy Dunnett’s brilliant writing, you won’t be disappointed. I have read the full series three times over and the first book more than double that. I read them late into the night, first thing in the morning, in...
The Mysterious Emily Brontë

The Mysterious Emily Brontë

From The Hairpin: Charlotte [Brontë’s] biographies are always massive, the most fully fleshed and juicy with lots of first-hand accounts. Emily’s are skeletal, vague, and full of conjecture, barely sketched. The real danger in leaving an Emily-sized cache of documents...
Jane Austen’s Final Novel

Jane Austen’s Final Novel

From The New Yorker: On March 18, 1817, Jane Austen stopped writing a book. We know the date because she wrote it at the end of the manuscript, in her slanting hand. She had done the same at the beginning of the manuscript, on January 27th of that year. In the seven...